worlds

Images by Daniel Jarosch

2020. tile-body, barro negro, engobe. 30 × 30 x 50cm each


How do we give birth to the world? This question has been explored in a feminist context, especially by the Italian women of the philosophers’group DIOTIMA. And this formulation can be taken literally. It takes up the “maternal” activity of giving birth, but also the “maternal” work of language acquisition, that is, the two distinctive points of a person’s entry into the world. Giving birth to the world is understood here as work on the symbolic in that it draws attention to how the world emerges from the language and thinking of the individual person but also from the speaking of different persons. Our being in the world becomes alive as a relationship to the world, which is created trough speech, conveyed through speech and remains open to change, especially through speech. Gender difference can prove to be a central mediating factor. In her work, Judith Klemenc poses a question that goes one step further: how do worlds (here there are two, a light-skinned world with black contours and continents remaining white and a dark-skinned world with continents filled with white) give birth, and how can it be possible to give birth to other worlds? Perhaps worlds in which the continents are no longer white, but colorful, nuanced, plural etc.
How do we give birth to the world? This question has been explored in a feminist context, especially by the Italian women of the philosophers’group DIOTIMA. And this formulation can be taken literally. It takes up the “maternal” activity of giving birth, but also the “maternal” work of language acquisition, that is, the two distinctive points of a person’s entry into the world. Giving birth to the world is understood here as work on the symbolic in that it draws attention to how the world emerges from the language and thinking of the individual person but also from the speaking of different persons. Our being in the world becomes alive as a relationship to the world, which is created trough speech, conveyed through speech and remains open to change, especially through speech. Gender difference can prove to be a central mediating factor. In her work, Judith Klemenc poses a question that goes one step further: how do worlds (here there are two, a light-skinned world with black contours and continents remaining white and a dark-skinned world with continents filled with white) give birth, and how can it be possible to give birth to other worlds? Perhaps worlds in which the continents are no longer white, but colorful, nuanced, plural etc.

Elisabeth Schäfer